Sunday, February 28, 2010

February Genealogy To Do List - Review

February ended up being a good genealogy month. Some snow days kept my work schedule from taking over but a cold kept me down this past week. Let's see how I did.

For February I wanted to:
  • Start work resourcing BASCOM line. I currently have 162 images left to add to my database with correct source citations. I could probably finish them all this month, but since this line has tons of my beginning research, I know there are some holes to fill with better research. So I think I will keep my goal of finishing this line by the end of March. I was able to finish this line which means the entire project is done!
  • Complete 3 years of the Vevay Newspaper Index. Completed 3 years (1889, 1890 1891).
  • Work on Ohio county, Indiana death records when FHL film arrives. My film finally arrived and I found many deaths including my brick wall, George E HILLIS. Unfortuneatly it did not contain his parents' names. I still need to add this information to my tree and make sure found all the records that I needed before the film goes back to Salt Lake.
  • Clean up Ancestry hints. I started going through these yesterday and found a few things that I need to add to my database or discard. Done, except they keep generating!
  • Work on some cousin connections through Ancestry. I've found some people with extra research on my ancestors and have been putting off contacting them. Contacted two researched, but only heard back from one. Great info from her though!
  • Register for the Ohio Genealogical Society Conference. Done!
Looks like I did everything I intended (plus some other things). Hope next month is as productive. How did everyone else do this month?

Friday, February 26, 2010

Angela Catherine COUCHIE - 21st Smile for the Camera


This is my entry into the 21st Edition of Smile For The Camera "Give Their Face A Place."

March is Women's History month and you are asked to picture women back into history. The unknown, known and unsung women who are often the foundation of our family history. Give their face a place. The interpretation is yours. Admission is free with every photograph!

Your submission may include as many or as few words as you feel are necessary to describe your treasured photograph. Those words may be in the form of an expressive comment, a quote, a journal entry, a poem (your own or a favorite), a scrapbook page, or a heartfelt article. The choice is yours!

This is a photo of my great grandmother, Angela Catherine COUCHIE EISWERTH.

Angela, who went by Catherine most of her life, was born in Beaver county, Pennsylvania to Enos KAVCIC and Apolonia ALBRECHT, Austrian immigrants, on 21 May 1900. She married Edward Charles EISWERTH on 14 Oct 1919 in East Palestine, Columbiana county, Ohio. He was 15 years her senior. She had one child, my grandfather. The family moved back to Edward's birthplace of Limestone township, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania where they ran a farm. Edward died in 1949. Catherine died 20 years later on 16 Sep 1969 in Williamsport, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania.

My dad remembered Catherine in a Sentimental Sunday post recently.

Winter 2010 GeneaBlogger Games - Final Recap

In a final push to get all my medals for the Winter 2010 GeneaBlogger Games, I was pretty successful. Here are my final standings:

1. Go Back and Cite Your Sources - Double Platinum Medal.

2. Back Up Your Data - Platinum Medal

3. Organize Your Research - Platinum Medal

4. Expand Your Knowledge - Platinum Medal
Today I completed my final task: "Task D: Visit tutorial and learning pages of popular websites such as Ancestry.com or FamilySearch’s excellent articles repository." I have used these in the pasts, but looked through them again. Ancestry's article "Research Cornerstones: Plan Your Attack" by Donn Devine is a great article and an area in my research where I need to work harder.

5. Write, Write, Write! - Platinum Medal.
Today I finished 2 tasks. I reviewed and edited my blog's "About" page that I wrote a few weeks ago for Task A. Then I wrote a short bio of my great grandmother and submitted it along with a photo of her holding me dad when he was a fat baby to the 21st Smile for the Camera. That completed Tasks D and B. So I guess I really completed 3 tasks.

6. Reach Out and Perform Genealogical Acts of Kindness - Finally sent in my registration to the Ohio Genealogical Society's Conference and became a member of their society. Completing Task F gives me a Platinum Medal.

Follow Friday: Kindred Footprints

This week's Follow Friday recommendation is the blog Kindred Footprints by Sharon (my newly found cousin, see below).

Sharon and I discovered yesterday through her blog and Twitter that we are 8th cousins (I think that's calculated right, cousin calculations always confuse me). Reading Sharon's blog I realized that she and I had ancestors who had lived in the Niagara region of Ontario, Canada. I was so excited to find someone who actually was interested in the same region as I am (since it seems that my Indiana counties are rare in the genealogy world). Little did I know what we would find.

I sent her some of my surnames from that area and we found a match. Our 6th great grandfather Jacob HAINS. Of course I didn't even know about Jacob yet. Which makes it even more exciting for me to find a cousin and a new ancestor! Plus we have a connection on our WHITMORE line through marriage. We have just started exchanging information and I can't wait to see what we can find together!

As for Sharon's blog, make sure you check it out. Once again it reminds me of the importance of putting our research out there for others to find. Here are a few of her recent posts:
Niagara Road Trip
Sharondipity Strikes Again
I also love Sharon's ancestor bios and need to do this more myself:
John J Manley Jr. (1893-1936)
Edward J Manley (1886-1939)

Thursday, February 25, 2010

Winter 2010 GeneaBlogger Games - Days 11, 12 & 13 Recaps

Sickness and work have left little time for these games. But I have made some progress today. I wrote a timeline of my great grandmother, Alice Susan HILLIS' life. I plan to use write a series of articles about her life next week for the Carnival of Genealogy.

Here are my standings in the Winter 2010 GeneaBlogger Games:

1. Go Back and Cite Your Sources - Double Platinum Medal.

2. Back Up Your Data - After reading the posts of Linda at Documenting the Details and Granny Pam at Granny's Genealogy I have decided that since I can recover from a disaster without losing more than a month's worth of data I deserve the Platinum Medal. I don't have documents that need secured because I scan everything and have few originals.

3. Organize Your Research - I also see that John at Transylvania Dutch has interpreted the rules like I was thinking of doing. Since I have organized 90 digital files that counts as 4 medals. I have probably done more since that tally, but combined with 2 other tasks, I am giving myself a Platinum Medal.

4. Expand Your Knowledge - Completed Task B for a Diamond Medal.

5. Write, Write, Write! - Gold Medal.

6. Reach Out and Perform Genealogical Acts of Kindness - Finally sent in my registration to the Ohio Genealogical Society's Conference and became a member of their society. Completing Task F gives me a Platinum Medal.

Timeline of the Life of Alice Susan HILLIS

Here is the timeline that I made for the 2010 GeneaBlogger Games and the Carnival of Genealogy. I chose to plot out the life of my great grandmother Alice Susan HILLIS and interweaved her life with that of her siblings and children. I am missing records from her later years as censuses are not available yet. I need to go through city directories more and find out more about the family. It is interesting to see how both families moved around the Cincinnati Tri-State area. I will be writing more articles about Alice for the COG and linking them to this timeline. Look for those next week.

5 Sep 1886 - Alice's parents, George E HILLIS and Mary Susan WASHBURN, marry in Cincinnati, Hamilton county, Ohio.
24 Dec 1887 - Brother Joseph Mills HILLIS is born in Cincinnati, Ohio.
13 Dec 1888 - Brother Francis Marion is born in Cincinnati, Ohio
13 Aug 1896 - Sister Sylvia C is born in Kentucky.
1 Apr 1896 - Alice Susan HILLIS is born in Rabbit Hash, Boone county, Kentucky.
16 Nov 1898 - Sister Vallie I HILLIS is born in Indiana
5 Jun 1900 - The HILLIS family is enumerated in the 1900 US census in Anderson township, Hamilton county, Ohio.
Abt 1901 - Brother George HILLIS is born in Indiana.
May 1909 - A child is born to George and Mary.
7 Jul 1909 - The child dies in Ohio county, Indiana.
21 Apr 1910 - The HILLIS family is enumerated in the 1910 US census in Rising Sun, Ohio county, Indiana.
30 Dec 1906 - Son Barret Guy HILLIS is born in Indiana.
29 Feb 1912 - Mary gives birth to a stillborn son, Willard HILLIS.
1913 - Alice's father, George E HILLIS dies in Rising Sun Indiana.
2 Oct 1915 - Sister Sylvia marries Sidney Sayers CLEMENTS in Cincinnati, Ohio.
10 Jan 1917 - Alice Susan HILLIS marries Dewey Francis BASCOM in Lawrenceburg, Dearborn county, Indiana.
2 Sep 1918 - Alice and Dewey welcome their first child, Francis L BASCOM. He is born in Indiana.
19 Apr 1919 - Alice's mother, Mary Susan WASHBURN, dies in Cincinnati, Ohio.
6 Jan 1920 - Alice, Dewey and Francis are enumerated in the 1920 US Census in Aurora, Dearborn county, Indiana.
Abt 1922 - Brother Joseph marries Margaret.
30 Jun 1922 - Son Robert Bascom is born in Rising Sun, Indiana.
Abt 1923 - Sister Vallie marries Fred HESS.
1924 - Daughter is born in Covington, Kenton county, Kentucky.
6 Feb 1926 - Brother Francis marries Mary Ann JOHNSTON in Cincinnati, Ohio.
16 Jan 1927 - Mother in law, Susan SANDERS, dies in Hamilton, Butler county, Ohio.
1927 - Another daughter is born in Ohio.
14 Feb 1930 - Son Robert dies from strep throat in Hamilton, Butler county, Indiana.
9 Apr 1930 - Alice, Dewey and children are enumerated in Hamilton, Ohio.
30 Mar 1934 - Father in law, Willard Theodore BASCOM, dies in Hamilton, Ohio.
1935 - The family is enumerated in the 1935 Florida state census in Plant City, Hillsborough county, Florida.
1937-1942 - Family in the Cincinnati city directories living in Norwood, Hamilton county, Ohio. Dewey is a truck driver.
1944 - Family is in Norwood running G & M Fruits.
Late 1940s - Children marry in Cincinnati.
May 1974 - Brother Joseph dies in El Dorado, Butler county, Kansas.
2 Jun 1975 - Dewey dies in Hamilton county, Ohio.
12 Oct 1977 - Brother Francis dies in Rising Sun, Ohio county, Indiana.
31 Jul 1979 - Alice dies in Hamilton county, Ohio.
12 Apr 1984 - Son Francis dies in Newport, Campbell county, Kentucky.
14 Jan 1994 - Sister Vallie dies in Rising Sun, Indiana.
15 Jul 1995 - Brother Barrett dies in Hamilton county, Ohio.

Alice's two daughters are still living.

52 Weeks to Better Genealogy - Week 8 - Online Maps

The topic for this week's "52 Weeks to Better Genealogy" series by Amy Coffin is:

Discover online map collections. Historical maps are wonderful tools for historical research. Fortunately for genealogists, many map collections are located online. Some of the more prominent collections are: the American Memory Collection at the Library of Congress, the David Rumsey Map Collection, and the Perry-CastaƱeda Library Map Collection at the University of Texas at Austin. Take some time to browse each of these collections. You may also want to check the library web site of your local university (or one near your ancestral home) to see what maps they may have online. If you have a genealogy blog, write about any special maps you find during this activity.

I checked out each of the 3 collection to see what they had available for the area where my ancestors lived. I looked for Switzerland county, Indiana and only found it in the David Rumsey Map Collection.

The Perry-CastaƱeda Library Map Collection only contained current maps of Indiana and no counties. These were statewide maps and not county or town specific.

The Library of Congress did not have any maps from Switzerland county. I think that this collection is great though if you are adding stories to your ancestoral stories as there are many battle maps and transportation maps.

The David Rumsey collection had one map of Switzerland county. It was a map from 1876 and shows where all the township lines are and will be very helpful in determining where the land that my ancestors purchased was located.

I hope that more maps are continually added to these collections to make them even more worthwhile to me and other researchers.

Wednesday, February 24, 2010

Wordless Wednesday: WWII Chris Williams

Another post in my series of my grandfather's WWII photos from Alaska.

Tuesday, February 23, 2010

Tombstone Tuesday: Reuben ECK

Reuben ECK was born 18 Sep 1817 (according to the Goshenhoppen Baptismal Registers, but his tombstone states his birth as 15 Aug 1817) in Berks county, Pennsylvania to Joseph ECK and Mary BAUER.

He married Mary REINHARD on 6 Feb 1840.

He died 20 Feb 1884. He is buried in the Immaculate Conception Cemetery in Bastress, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania.

Monday, February 22, 2010

Winter 2010 GeneaBlogger Games - Days 9 & 10 Recap

I haven't participated in the 2010 Winter GeneaBlogger Games these past two days because I haven't been feeling well. I hope to get back on track tomorrow and get more medals. I did spend some more time today in the Norfolk, England parish registers and made some great discoveries which deserve their own blog post.

Medals standings:
4 Gold Medals
1 Diamond Medal
1 Double Platinum Medal

Saturday, February 20, 2010

Winter 2010 GeneaBlogger Games - Day 8 Recap

Last night I found that FamilySearch had added images for the Norfolk, England parish registers to their pilot site. Finally the parish where my ancestors lived was available. So I have spent several hours searching through these records. Most of today I focused on the family of Caroline RICE and found her mother's name, Sarah WATSON, and all of her brothers and sisters. Then I finally found Sarah and her husband John in the census (too many John's to do it before).

My husband was also kind enough to go with me to the cemetery down the road from us. I attempted to complete a photo request from Find A Grave, but the stone that we think was the right one was covered with snow and ice. My husband suggested getting the scapper out of the car and taking care of it, but the look I gave him took care of that idea.

I was able to take several other photos and added them to Find A Grave. I think this summer when I need out of the house I will attempt to take photos of every stone in this cemetery (Bowers Cemetery in Fort Wayne, Indiana). I added George W and Laura E Miller, James and Corrilla Evard, William M and Laura A Andrews and Berniece M Bickel.

But now I need to find a different researcher to help with a lookup. Anyone need something from the Allen County Public Library?

Here are my standings in the Winter 2010 GeneaBlogger Games:

1. Go Back and Cite Your Sources - Double Platinum Medal. I actually added some more today, but going for Triple Platinum may be a little too overachieving even for me.

2. Back Up Your Data - Gold Medal.

3. Organize Your Research - Gold Medal.

4. Expand Your Knowledge - Gold Medal.

5. Write, Write, Write! - Gold Medal.

6. Reach Out and Perform Genealogical Acts of Kindness - Completed Task B (Add Find A Grave photo) and now have a Diamond Medal.

Friday, February 19, 2010

Winter 2010 GeneaBlogger Games - Day 7 Recap

Today I spent the morning at the Allen County Public Library viewing the film that I had ordered from the Family History Library (Ohio county, Indiana death records). I found what I was looking for, but it didn't have what I was looking for. Does that make sense? I'll blog about it soon. Then I spent the afternoon watching African American Lives 2 on Netflix Instant. Which means that my medal standing remains the same.

Here are my standings in the Winter 2010 GeneaBlogger Games:

1. Go Back and Cite Your Sources - Double Platinum Medal.

2. Back Up Your Data - Gold Medal.

3. Organize Your Research - Gold Medal.

4. Expand Your Knowledge - Gold Medal.

5. Write, Write, Write! - Gold Medal.

6. Reach Out and Perform Genealogical Acts of Kindness - Gold Medal!

Medal totals:
5 Gold Medals
1 Double Platinum

Follow Friday: Creative Gene

This week for Follow Friday I am highlighting Jasia's blog Creative Gene.

Jasia is the hostess of the Carnival of Genealogy. Once or twice a month she will post a topic for genealogy bloggers to write about on their blogs. After the Carnival's deadline, she compiles a list of all of the submissions.

Recently the Carnival took on a great reinvention. Now Jasia only highlights the first 30 entries into the Carnival and picks one to spotlight. The last Carnival topic was the iGene awards where geneabloggers chose their best posts of 2009. Footnote Maven was chosen as the featured author.

I love reading everyone's submissions and make sure you check out Jasia's own 2009 iGene awards where she features some of her best articles and photos from last year.

I Found My Valentine (BLITZ)

Valentine BLITZ is my all-time favorite ancestor. I love saying his name. I love that he wasn't a farmer, instead he was a stone mason. Valentine was born 1828 in Hesse-Darmstadt. He immigrated to the United States and married Margaretta LUTZ and lived in Williamsport, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania. He died in 1898.

I didn't have Valentine's date of death until this week. I had hoped that his gravestone would have been in the set of photos that my aunt sent me last summer, but he was missing. Where was my Valentine?

This week I received a copy of Lycoming County Cemeteries: St Boniface published by the Lycoming County Genealogical Society. (A birthday present from my husband.)

Of course the first thing I did when I got the book was look for Valentine BLITZ. And there he was. Entry number 268: Valentine Blitz (1828-1898).

Now I know that Valentine is buried in St Boniface Cemetery with many of my other ancestors. I also now know that he is in section C of the cemetery. I hope to point my aunt that way this spring and finally get a photo of his gravestone.

Valentine wasn't the only ancestor I found in the book. He's just the one that made me do a genealogy happy dance. I made a list of the gravestones that I was missing and hope that equipped with the section and a map of the cemetery I will have a complete set of photos of my ancestors' graves by this summer.

Thursday, February 18, 2010

Winter 2010 GeneaBlogger Games - Day 6 Recap

Today was a light genealogy day as I spent the morning fixing the battery on my netbook so that I can take it to the library with my tomorrow and the afternoon at work. But it is amazing what you can get done when you prepublish things to your blog. Today my 52 Weeks to Better Genealogy Post went up and it included a look at Google Maps (2 tasks completed).

Here are my standings in the Winter 2010 GeneaBlogger Games:

1. Go Back and Cite Your Sources - Total of 105 sources written. I'm calling that a Double Platinum Medal.

2. Back Up Your Data - Gold Medal.

3. Organize Your Research - 90 digital files organized. I also went through the few random paper files that I had and trashed notes that I had already dealt with and filed a few that should have already been filed. I did more than 20 of those for Task A. So now I have a Gold Medal.

4. Expand Your Knowledge - Tasks A, C and E are done. Gold Medal.

5. Write, Write, Write! - Tasks C, E and F complete. Gold Medal.

6. Reach Out and Perform Genealogical Acts of Kindness - Gold Medal!

Medal totals:
5 Gold Medals
1 Double Platinum

52 Weeks to Better Genealogy: Week 7 - Google Maps

This week's 52 Weeks to Better Genealogy written by Amy Coffin is:

Play with Google Maps. This is a helpful tool for determining the locations of addresses in your family history. Where your ancestral homestead once stood may now be a warehouse, a parking lot or a field. Perhaps the house is still there. When you input addresses in Google Maps, don’t forget to use the Satellite View and Street View options for perspectives that put you were right there where your ancestors once stood. If you’ve used this tool before, take sometime and play with it again. Push all the buttons, click all the links and devise new ways it can help with your personal genealogy research. If you have a genealogy blog, write about your experiences with Google Maps, or suggest similar easy (and free) tools that have helped in your own research.

I chose to map where some of my ancestors lived in Williamsport, Pennsylvania.
The green pin is where Valentine BLITZ and family lived on Hughes Street.
The red pin is where Frank A HAEFNER and family lived on Franklin Street, now a parking lot.
The blue pin is St. Boniface Church where both families were members and my family still attend.
The yellow pin is the Williamsport Cemetery (also known as the Washington Street Cemetery) where some of the BLITZ family are buried.

It is interesting to look at where these families lived and see how close they were to each other, their church and other locations.

Wednesday, February 17, 2010

Winter 2010 GeneaBlogger Games - Day 5

Today was an exciting day for me. I added the final source citation and organized the last digital image in my quest to resource my family tree! I still have a few scattered files that need organized before I can say that I am done though. I should finish those tomorrow. I'll post a separate blog post about this experience soon.

I also went through the Opening Ceremony post and followed a bunch of genealogy bloggers and added many new blogs to my Google Reader.

Here are my standings in the Winter 2010 GeneaBlogger Games:

1. Go Back and Cite Your Sources - an additional 20 images puts my total at 105. I'm calling that a Double Platinum Medal.

2. Back Up Your Data - Gold Medal.

3. Organize Your Research - digital files organized stands at 90 (that's like 4 1/2 medals, right?) I have a Silver Medal though.

4. Expand Your Knowledge - Silver Medal.

5. Write, Write, Write! - Silver Medal.

6. Reach Out and Perform Genealogical Acts of Kindness - Completed Task G today. That's 3 tasks done and a Gold Medal!

Medal totals:
3 Silver Medals
2 Gold Medal
1 Double Platinum Medal

Wordless Wednesday: WWII Tommy Johnston

Another post in my series of my grandfather's WWII photos from Alaska.

Tuesday, February 16, 2010

Winter 2010 GeneaBlogger Games - Day 4 Recap

Today I completed 27 source citations and organized 27 images. I finished resourcing the family of James M SHEPHERD and started the family of John SHEPHERD. I have 20 more images to go and half a family to finish. As the film I ordered from Family History Library arrived today, so I have some new research to start as I finish up this organization project.

I also prepublished two blog posts (I love this feature and use it all the time).

Here are my standings in the Winter 2010 GeneaBlogger Games:

1. Go Back and Cite Your Sources - adding 27 to my total of 58 gives me a total of 85 citations, Very close to my Double Platinum medal. I currently hold a Platinum Medal.

2. Back Up Your Data - still have a Gold Medal.

3. Organize Your Research - digital files organized stands at 70 (that's like 3 1/2 medals, right?) I have a Silver Medal though.

4. Expand Your Knowledge - Completed task C and E today. Made memorial page of great grandfather, Edward Charles EISWERTH on Footnote and added a surname visualization to my surname page. That's two tasks done for a Silver Medal.

5. Write, Write, Write! - I prepublished two blog posts (task C) and updated my surname page and Ahnentafel page (task E). Two tasks complete and a Silver Medal.

6. Reach Out and Perform Genealogical Acts of Kindness - Didn't do anything today. Of course I did tell my friend to have her son join the genealogy social media community, but that's as close as I have come to getting another researcher online with us. So I still have a Silver Medal.

Medal totals:
4 Silver Medals
1 Gold Medal
1 Platinum Medal

Tombstone Tuesday: August P EISWERTH

August Peter EISWERTH was born 29 Aug 1887 to Lewis EISWERTH and Maria DINCHER. He died 8 Apr 1926. He is buried in the Immaculate Conception Cemetery in Bastress, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania.

August P Eiswerth marker, Immaculate Conception Cemetery, Bastress (Lycoming), Pennsylvania; photo taken by DKE, 2009.

Monday, February 15, 2010

Winter 2010 GeneaBlogger Games - Day Three Recap

Today I finished resourcing the family of Isaac C BOVARD. That made 24 new source citations and 24 organized digital images. I have 2 more families to resource and 44 images (either from those families or ones that I missed). I also finished 1890 in my Vevay Newspaper Index and posted it online.

Here are my standings in the Winter 2010 GeneaBlogger Games:

1. Go Back and Cite Your Sources - adding 24 to my total of 34 gives me 58 citatons and a Platinum Medal! (I think I'm going to go for Double Platinum in this event.)

2. Back Up Your Data - still have a Gold Medal.

3. Organize Your Research - 19 digital files plus the 24 today gives me 43. That gives me a Silver Medal for 2 tasks complete (B and E). I wonder if I can count doing the same task twice? Then I could have a gold medal.

4. Expand Your Knowledge - Did not compete yet

5. Write, Write, Write! - Did not compete yet

6. Reach Out and Perform Genealogical Acts of Kindness - did more indexing, but no new task today, still have Silver Medal. I need the snow to melt so that I can take a gravestone photo, but more is in the forecast for tonight and tomorrow. Might just need to wear some boots and suck it up!

Medal totals:
2 Silver Medals
1 Gold Medal
1 Platinum Medal

Sunday, February 14, 2010

Winter 2010 GeneaBlogger Games - Day 2 Recap

Today I worked on resourcing the family of Benjamin F POTTER. I did 26 new citations and organized 12 images. (I have 3 more family groups to go before this project is done.) I also worked on adding some Connecticut vital information to my tree, totaling 40 data entries.

Here are my standings:

1. Go Back and Cite Your Sources - 8 yesterday, 26 today equals 34 and a Gold Medal!

2. Back Up Your Data - still have a Gold Medal from yesterday.

3. Organize Your Research - 19 digital files, need one more, but did some data entry (task E) so that's a Bronze Medal!

4. Expand Your Knowledge - Did not compete yet

5. Write, Write, Write! - Did not compete yet

6. Reach Out and Perform Genealogical Acts of Kindness - nothing new today, still have Silver Medal

So my medal todals are 1 Bronze medal, 1 Silver medal and 2 gold medals!

Saturday, February 13, 2010

Winter 2010 Geneablogger Games - Day One Recap

Day one of competitions for the Winter 2010 GeneaBlogger Games was a good genealogy day for me. I finished resourcing and organizing digital files for the family of Carley H BASCOM (total of 8 citations and 7 images). I indexed 5 months for my Vevay Newspaper Index. I also posted a comment to a new genealogy blog "Ancestry Chronicles".

So here are my standings:
1. Go Back and Cite Your Sources - 8 done, 2 more for bronze medal and 42 to platinum

2. Back Up Your Data - files automatically backed up to Mozy means Gold medal for me!

3. Organize Your Research - 7 images organized, 13 more for bronze medal

4. Expand Your Knowledge - did not compete today

5. Write, Write, Write! - did not compete today

6. Reach Out and Perform Genealogical Acts of Kindness - completed Task A by posting new comment and Task E by indexing so Silver Medal for me!

I currently have one silver medal and one gold medal. So far so good! I hope everyone is having as much fun as I am with these games.

Friday, February 12, 2010

Winter 2010 GeneaBloggers Games - My Opening Ceremony Entrance

Tonight are the opening ceremonies for the 2010 Winter Olympics, but it is also the opening ceremonies of an even (in my opinion) better event the "Winter 2010 GeneaBloggers Games"

I am going to strive for gold in the "Winter 2010 GeneaBloggers Games". I am really excited about these games, because I have been practicing for almost 2 years now and have high hopes for myself and all the other geneabloggers.

First of all, here is the new "Gen Wish List" Flag for the games.
Since my ancestry is highly German, I started with the German flag in the back. I added the US flag for my own life and where my ancestors immigrated over many centuries. I added a smaller flag of the United Kingdom to signify my English and Northern Irish roots. Although there are more countries that I could have added to my flag, these are the most important to my heritage.

So now that I have walked into the stadium waving my flag, you are wondering what events I will be participating. I will be seeking golds in all of the Games:
1. Go Back and Cite Your Sources
2. Back Up Your Data
3. Organize Your Research
4. Expand Your Knowledge
5. Write, Write, Write!
6. Reach Out and Perform Genealogical Acts of Kindness

Here is how I will know that I did my best:
  • I need to finish resourcing my genealogy database. I should be able to finish by the end of the month. I currently have 67 digital files to organize and cite. Some of those census images have more than one family, so I'll have more citations to write along with citations for databases without images.
  • I need to remember to back up my files when my computer schedules its backup to my removable hard drive since I usually don't hook it up. Mozy backs up my data online at least once a day.
  • I should also work on tagging and sorting through all the digital photos I obtained from my grandfather's collections.
  • I enjoy learning new things, so expanding my knowledge should be fun. Plus I made a new year's resolution to write up some ancestral biographies, so the Games should give me some motivation to do my first one.
  • Writing on the blog has been coming easier since I committed to it, as well as commenting on other blogs.
In my head, I am prepared for these Winter Games. I just hope that my mind and body (and work schedule) cooperate to help me do my best! I look forward to seeing how well all the other geneabloggers do with in the Games.

Follow Friday: Lessons From My Ancestors

This week's Follow Friday recommendation is Sara Beth's Lessons From My Ancestor's blog.

Sara was lucky enough to find her 5th great grandmother's diary preserved in a DC museum. Her posts about Sylvia's Diary are so moving. Sara's emotions when she first touched the diary are something all of us feel when we find a connection to our ancestors.

Sara recently made a commitment to adding more of her family history to her blog. I look forward to more of her posts as she explores her own memories and what she has found about her ancestors. I especially loved her take this week on Treasure Chest Thursday where she wrote about her family's love for Mountain Dew.

I hope that you will take a look at Sara's blog and follow along as she shares her family history with the rest of us.

Thursday, February 11, 2010

Finding More than One Obituary for Carley H BASCOM

As many of you know, I have been working on an index to the Vevay newspapers in Switzerland county, Indiana. When I first found out that these newspapers were available online, I started looking in my database and finding death dates of my ancestors and seeing if I could find their obituaries or death notices.

One of the first ones I found was for Carley H Bascom, my fourth great grandfather. He was born 27 Aug 1815 in Vermont. On 22 Dec 1838 he married Elizabeth POTTER in Switzerland county, Indiana. He died 5 May 1889 in East Enterprise, Switzerland county, Indiana. He is buried in the Bovard Cemetery in Switzerland county.

The Vevay Reveille, 09 May 1889

This death notice told me the date of Carley's death (that I knew from his tombstone) and his place of death (which I had figured based on his residence).

After finding a few obits and death notices of my ancestors, I decided that I should start the index to help others find their ancestors and give me a chance to comb through the newspapers to find more mentions of my ancestors.

This week I finally got to the 1889 newspapers. I found the death notice for Carley again. Then I got a surprise. In the following week's newspaper I found under the East Enterprise news section:

The Vevay Reveille, 16 May 1889

Now this is what I wanted to see! Carley's son was H B BASCOM (actually it should be R B, Robert Bruce, probably a typo) and his grandson was E H (Edward H) BASCOM. Carley came with his parents to Indiana in 1816. His father was Gains BASCOM, which I knew from my other research. But I had never found any evidence of his mother's name, Martha.

I thought for sure that Martha was lost and I would never find her name. Had I stopped at the first death notice I never would have found this information about Carley's family. I'm glad that I am talking the time to search the Vevay newspapers for my ancestors because of finds like this!

Now if only I can find the family in Vermont.

52 Weeks to Better Genealogy - Week 6 - Online Databases

This week's "52 Weeks to Better Genealogy" challenge from Amy Coffin and hosted by Geneabloggers is:

Online databases at your public library. Search your library’s web site and see if your card grants you access to online databases. Libraries (even small ones) often have wonderful online tools including genealogy databases, historical newspapers and more! Take some time and play with these little perks that come with a library card. You just may get some help in your own genealogy research and gain some free research tools to boot. If you don’t know how to access online library databases or you’re not sure if your branch has them, ask a librarian for guidance. If you have a blog, discuss which databases (if any) to which your library subscribes.

The Allen County Public Library's website gives many databases that are available within the library and at home with your library card. They have a large list of research databases that are available for a variety of topics.

For Genealogy, the library has access to the following databases:
  • Ancestry
  • Footnote
  • HeritageQuestOnline
  • New England Ancestors
  • Origins Network: British, Irish & Scots
  • World Vital Records
All of these databases are available in the library only. I really wish that Heritage Quest was available with a library card. Since HeritageQuest is hosting ACPL's PERSI index, you would think it would be available at home as well.

Besides the large genealogy databases, ACPL's Genealogy Center has posted many small databases online that are accessible to everyone free of charge. You can find them at GenealogyCenter.info. Here you will find Allen County databases, Indiana databases, their military heritage site, bible records and more.

Wednesday, February 10, 2010

Wordless Wednesday: WWII Jesse Kreider

Another post in my series of my grandfather's WWII photos from Alaska.

Tuesday, February 9, 2010

Tombstone Tuesday: Lewis and Mary EISWERTH

Lewis EISWERTH was born 25 May 1849 in Bavaria to Lewis EISWERTH and Theresa WESTRICH. He died 28 Mar 1928.

Maria DINCHER was born 24 Jun 1850 in Lycoming county, Pennsylvania to Michael F DINCHER and Maria SCHILLING. She died 5 Apr 1926.

They were married 7 May 1871 and lived in Limestone township, Lycoming county Pennsylvania.

They are buried at the Immaculate Conception Cemetery in Bastress, Pennsylvania.

They are my great great grandparents.

Lewis and Mary E EISWERTH marker, Immaculate Conception Cemetery, Bastress (Lycoming), Pennsylvania; photo taken by DKE, 2009.

Monday, February 8, 2010

Adding Blogger Pages to My Blog

After reading Thomas MacEntee's post at the Geneabloggers blog called "Blogger Announces New Pages Feature", I knew what I needed to do to improve this blog.

Over the weekend I added 4 pages to the top of this blog. They are:
I hope that these pages will help my readers understand more about me and my research as well as help direct new cousins to my blog.

I encourage you to take a look at Thomas's blog post and learn more about adding pages to your blog. I think that you will find this feature very helpful. Let me know what you think about my pages as well. I would love your feedback as a comment or email to genwishlist@gmail.com.

Smile for the Camera: WWII Valentine

It's time for the 20th Edition of "Smile for the Camera" from the Shades of the Departed blog and magazine.

The word prompt is "Valentine." Love is in the air, so celebrate with Smile by sharing a photograph of a Valentine; be that person or paper. The interpretation of Valentine is yours. Admission is free with every photograph!

My entry comes from my grandfather's WWII collection.


I don't know who my grandfather, Roy Suckling, asked to be his valentine that year, but I know it wasn't my grandma.

Sunday, February 7, 2010

Sentimental Sunday: Annie COUCHIE

Remembering one of my paternal great aunts by Jim Eiswerth
One of my paternal grandmother’s (Catherine Couchie Eiswerth) older sisters was Anna. Anna was born 25 June 1898 and eventually married George Bernard Schultz. So I always knew her as Aunt Annie Schultz.

Aunt Annie ran a saltwater taffy shop on the New Jersey boardwalk. Whenever we saw her, she always brought boxes or bags of taffy along. My grandmother was tall like her brother Charles, but Aunt Annie was much shorter, and had a more outgoing personality … probably from running the saltwater taffy shop and meeting a lot of different people.

When my grandmother passed away in September 1969, after a long battle with cancer, Aunt Annie and Uncle Charles both came to her funeral. They had just lost their brother Frank a few months before that. Dad asked me to drive them and a few others over to Bastress for the funeral and burial at Immaculate Conception Church. Aunt Annie latched onto my arm and we supported each other throughout the sad services. I was really feeling down as we walked back to the car, and Aunt Annie was still holding on to my arm. She said thanks for helping her get through the services, but she was the one who really helped me. I really loved my grandmother, and it was obvious that Aunt Annie loved her sister.

Aunt Annie went back to New Jersey. Two of my sisters who liked to go to the Jersey Shore for vacations, visited Aunt Annie at her saltwater taffy shop several times. Aunt Annie out lived her siblings and finally passed on 8 April 1993 in Wildwood, Cape May, New Jersey.

Saturday, February 6, 2010

Surname Saturday: COUCHIE/KAVCIC

My great grandmother was Angela Catherine COUCHIE. She was born 21 May 1900 in Pennsylvania, most likely in Darlington township, Beaver county. (On her SS-5 she states her place of birth as East Palestine, Ohio, but the family was living in Darlington in the 1900 census.) She married Edward Charles EISWERTH on 14 Oct 1919 in East Palestine, Columbiana county, Ohio (just across the state line). She died 16 Sep 1969 in Williamsport, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania.

Her parents were Enos KAVCIC and Apolonia ALBRECHT. Enos was born 10 Aug 1856 in Austria. He married Apolonia in 1881 and the couple immigrated to the United States in 1892 with their two young children Mary and Helena. The settled in Beaver county, Pennsylvania and Enos became a natualized citizen on 5 Nov 1898 in Columbiana county, Ohio. He died 19 Oct 1908 and is buried at St Mary's Catholic Cemetery in East Palestine.

The children of Enos KAVCIC and Aplonia ALBRECHT were:
  • Mary COUCHIE born 18 Dec 1889 in Austria. Married Jacob TROBEC on 24 Jan 1909 and died 20 Jan 1967 in East Palestine, Ohio.
  • Helena COUCHIE born 5 Apr 1891 in Austria. Married Frank BOGATAY on 17 Jun 1907 and died 27 Mar 1916 in Salem, Columbiana county, Ohio.
  • Charles Carl COUCHIE born 6 Sep 1894 in East Palestine. Married Stella Viola TYSON on 27 Nov 1916 and died 24 Mar 1980 in Alliance, Stark county, Ohio.
  • Jean COUCHIE born 29 Dec 1896 in Pennsylvania. Married 15 Nov 1911 to Anthony BRELIH and died 16 Nov 1958 in East Palestine, Ohio.
  • Anna COUCHIE born 25 Jun 1898 in Pennsylvania. Married George Bernard SCHULZ and died 8 Apr 1993 in Wildwood, Cape May, New Jersey.
  • Angela Catherine COUCHIE (see above)
  • Frank Martin COUCHE born 21 Sep 1902 in Pennsylvania. Married Alice Veronica KEGELMYER and died 28 Jun 1969 in Buffalo, Erie county, New York.
According to the 1910 census, Apolonia was married to a Frank COUCHENE around 1909. I have a theory that Frank helped the family Americanize their surname as there is no record of Enos ever using COUCHIE. There is a Frank KAVCIC buried in St. Mary's Cemetery that could be Apolonia's second husband, meaning that he might have been related to Enos. The family also used different spellings as one son used COUCHE and Apolonia used COUCHEE.

Any cousins who would like to collaborate on this family and help find their records in Austria are encouraged to email me at genwishlist@gmail.com. I look forward to working together.

Friday, February 5, 2010

Follow Friday: Megan Smolenyak's Huffington Post Articles

This week's Follow Friday recommendation is for Megan Smolenyak Smolenyak's Huffington Post articles. Megan is best know in the genealogy community for her knowledge of DNA research, research into the ancestor's of famous people, creating Roots Television and founding UnclaimedPerson.org.

Recently, Megan has been writing genealogy articles for the Huffington Post. You can find all of Megan's articles for HuffPo on her bio page there.

Some of her articles include:
Are You My Cousin?
Unclaimed Persons
Name Game: Celebrities Have Nothing on the Rest of Us

Megan has done extensive research to figure out who the real Annie Moore (the first immigrant through Ellis Island) truly was. This week Megan released a photo that she and Annie's relatives have found that they believe to be Annie with her two brothers at Ellis Island the day they arrived in New York. What I love about Megan's articles about Annie is that she does not just make assumptions and say that must be the truth. She is digging for solid evidence in different ways to find the truth.

You can read more about Megan's research on Annie and see the photos of Annie that have surfaced in:
Getting History Wrong
Photos of Annie Moore, First Ellis Island Immigrant: Help Solve a History Mystery
Historical Photo? Is this Annie Moore Arriving at Ellis Island?

I can't wait to hear more about Megan's research and find out if this is really a photo of Annie Moore.

If you are looking for an RSS feed of just Megan's articles, you can find it on her bio page under her name.

Thursday, February 4, 2010

52 Weeks to Better Genealogy - Week 5 - WorldCat

This week's topic for "52 Weeks to Better Genealogy" is:

Play with WorldCat.org. WorldCat is a massive network of library content that the public can search for free (user name and password not required). Not every library is a part of WorldCat, but the vast size of the network makes it an important genealogy tool. If you are looking for a specific book or publication, enter the identifying information into the WorldCat search box and see which libraries hold the item. You may even find that you can get the item through your library’s inter-library loan program. Don’t forget to search for some of your more unusual surnames and see what comes up. The goal is to play with WorldCat and examine its possibilities for your own research. If you’re already familiar with WorldCat, play with it again. The network and collection grow and change constantly. If you have a genealogy blog, write about your experiences with searching WorldCat for this exercise.

I have used WorldCat in the past and have loved being able to search multiple library catalogs at once. Not everything is at the Allen County Public Library (no matter how hard I wish) so it is nice to see a larger selection of what is available.

I have done surname searches in the past and found many family histories that I would love to read. For example, I would really like to get a copy of Helen E Arkey's Eck families: a compilation of Eck families primarily listing descendants of Jacob Egg/Eck and Anna Maria Kilcher. It is only available through the Library of Congress and the Mid-Continent Public Library in Independence, Missouri.


I have an account on WorldCat that allows me to add books to a list. I have a list there of books I would like to view when I am in different locations. (Now I just need to find the time to go to all these libraries!) It is a great tool for planning a research trip so that you know where to research and maximize your gains.

Wednesday, February 3, 2010

Wordless Wednesday: WWII John L Walkovich

Another post in my series of my grandfather's WWII photos from Alaska.

John L Walkovich
P.O. Box 49
Portage, Pa.

If anyone knows more about John L Walkovich of Portage, Pennsylvania, I would love to add his story to this photo. Send me an email to genwishlist@gmail.com.

Tuesday, February 2, 2010

Tombstone Tuesday: Catherine and Edward EISWERTH


Angela Catherine COUCHIE was born 21 May 1900 in Pennsylvania (probably Darlington, Beaver county) to Enos KAVCIC and Apolonia ALBRECHT who both immigrated from Austria.

She married Edward Charles EISWERTH on 14 Oct 1919 in East Palestine, Columbiana county, Ohio.

Edward was born 22 Jun 1885 in Bastress, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania to Lewis M EISWERTH and Maria DINCHER. He died 7 Mar 1949.

Catherine died 16 Sep 1969.

They are both buried at the Immaculate Conception Cemetery in Bastress, Pennsylvania.

Edward and Catherine are my great grandparents. They had one child, my grandfather.

Catherine A and Edward C Eiswerth marker, Immaculate Conception Cemetery, Bastress (Lycoming), Pennsylvania; photo taken by DKE, 2009.

Finding Meaningful Ancestry Hints

One of the things I like about having my tree on Ancestry is the shaky leaf (Ancestry's way to tell you that it found something that may be of interest to you). I love when a hint pops up to let me know that Ancestry thinks it has found a record for one of my ancestors.

That said I also find the hints annoying. I hate receiving hints for English birth registrations when the person was born in Indiana. I hate getting all excited that there is a new hint only to find the hint about the wrong time and place.

Of course when I get a hint that a family moved west and it matches everything I know about the family and they disappeared from the town they were born, I love them. Without these hints I would never have tracked down a number of my ancestor's siblings who went to the frontier.

In the process of cleaning up my database, I also wanted to clean up my Ancestry hints. I had been putting these off for a long time. The main reason was that as of January 30th I had 522 hints. Way too many for me to process easily.

What I found was that most of these hints were for matches to other trees on Ancestry. Although I find these trees to be helpful in giving me a direction to take when I get stuck, I never add them to my tree. I needed these family tree hints out of my shaky leaves so that I could find the records hidden within those 522 hints.

Ancestry started Member Connect at the end of July in 2009. Member Connect gives another place on each person's individual page to make connections to others researching the same person. You can see what sources they have used and what information they have that you don't.

So why does Ancestry continue to add family trees to their hints? I wish that they would discontinue this duplication. Plus I hate that it makes it seem that you should just add unsourced information to your tree in order to get more people added.

I went through my Ancestry hints and got them down from 522 to 18 by manually ignoring each family tree hint. 18 actual records that I need to analyze and add to my tree if they are a match. 18 records that might break down a brick wall. 18 records that are useful to my research and my time.

How did I get the number so far down? I told Ancestry to ignore all of the family tree hints. That information is still readily available to me through the Member Connect section. I don't need it in two places.

I wish that I hadn't had to waste my time to find the good stuff when there seems to be an easy fix.

Disclosure: I was not paid by anyone for this review. These are my own thoughts and desires to see some changes.

Monday, February 1, 2010

My GG Grandfather's Immigration (And The Woman who Followed her Recreant Husband across an Ocean)

This is the story of my ancestor's immigration and the interesting woman who shared the voyage with him.

My great great grandfather was William Watson SUCKLING. He was born 28 Apr 1860 in Terrington St. Clement, Norfolk, England. He was the 8th child of John Elvey SUCKLING and Caroline RICE.

The family bible tells us more about his life:

William Watson Suckling Born in the year of 1860. Came to Canada by New York in Jan 4 Per White Star line Married & settled in St.Catherines Was choir leader of Congregational Church on Church St. Sang in almost every choir & concert Co of the city at the time Moving to Merritton in 1901

The 1911 Canada Census tells me that he immigrated in the year 1888.

I found William on the passenger list for the ship "Adriatic" that left England on 4 Jan 1888 and arrived in New York on 16 Jan 1888. He stayed in the second class cabin.
#253 W W Suckling - 27 - M - Baker - England

I decided to search newspapers in order to find out if there was any information about the arrival of this ship in New York in 1888. I searched the Google News Archive and found an very interesting article about a woman who shared the voyage with my ancestor.

New York Times, January 16, 1888
OUTWITTED BY HIS WIFE.
STARTLING SURPRISE FOR A RUNAWAY HUSBAND.
An exciting and peculiar flight and pursuit ended yesterday afternoon on the Red Star steamship pier in Jersey City. Mrs. Margaret Cospatrick Phillips, after following her recreant husband, John, across the Atlantic, captured him as he was leaving the ship and gave him such a talking to as would delight any despiser of men who desert their wives. And that wasn't the end. She roused him to such a pitch of fury that he spoke very warm words, and she struck him on the back of the neck. This proceeding was followed by the arrest of both, who were taken to the police station on a charge of disorderly conduct. Mr. Phillips was held for trial and Mrs. Phillips, as a witness, was allowed to go to a private house in charge of one of the residents of Jersey City, who became interested in her case.


Mr. and Mrs. Phillips lived in London at 2 Charles-street, Blackfriars. He was employed as a messenger in the banking house of Blake, Rossevain & Co., a branch of Blake Brothers of 18 Wall-street, this city. His salary was nearly (pounds)3 a week, and they took lodgers to enable them to pay the rent of their house. They had been married four years, and had two little children. Mrs. Phillips, who is an exceedingly attractive little woman, 24 years old, dressed in good taste, says her husband, who is three years older, never treated her as he should, and deceived her before marriage by pretending that he had money, which afterward proved a myth. On the Saturday after Christmas she found that he had secured passage on the Red Star steamship Switzerland, which had sailed from Antwerp on the previous day. She bundled her two children off to her mother's and went to the firm for whom her husband had worked, and told her story of wrongs. The firm secured passage for her on the White Star steamship Adriatic, which sailed from Liverpool on Jan. 4. The Adriatic was spoken off Fire Island about 4:30 on Saturday afternoon, and came up to her pier about 10 o'clock yesterday morning. The Switzerland arrived yesterday morning and was at her pier about 3:30 o'clock. Her steerage passengers were not taken off.


Attended by two detectives from Castle Garden, the wife confronted the amazed husband at theh Red Star Line pier. The scene was not affecting. Phillips glared at his wife, and she glared back at him, with the addition of words not at all complimentary. Husband and wife with the two detectives started back toward the steamer, grew excited and had a short battle of words, which was followed by Mrs. Phillips stepping behind her husband and striking him. This was all the excuse the detectived wanted for making the arrest.


A look back at the passenger lists, finds Mrs. Phillips in first class.
191 - Margt C. Phillips - 24 - spinster - USA

I love how she identifies herself as a spinster just days after her husband left her and before she confronts him. And was she really from the United States originally? Maybe her husband had first worked in the New York bank offices before going to London.

I wonder if my ancestor had any idea about the this woman who sailed across the Atlantic with him. Did they ever meet or talk? Or was he too worried about his own journey and new life to deal with this lady's problems?

It is amazing what we can find about our ancestor's lives without finding their names listed in the records.

February Genealogy To Do List

After a very productive January, I feel that I need to add some more goals this month. This month is already looking like a busy time at work and I should have some film arriving from FHL any day now, so we'll see how this month goes.

For February I want to:
  • Start work resourcing BASCOM line. I currently have 162 images left to add to my database with correct source citations. I could probably finish them all this month, but since this line has tons of my beginning research, I know there are some holes to fill with better research. So I think I will keep my goal of finishing this line by the end of March.
  • Complete 3 years of the Vevay Newspaper Index.
  • Work on Ohio county, Indiana death records when FHL film arrives.
  • Clean up Ancestry hints. I started going through these yesterday and found a few things that I need to add to my database or discard.
  • Work on some cousin connections through Ancestry. I've found some people with extra research on my ancestors and have been putting off contacting them.
  • Register for the Ohio Genealogical Society Conference.
I think that's a good list for the month. I can't wait to finish resourcing my tree and indexing the Vevay newspapers so that I can move on to new projects.

Are you making a monthly to do list on your blog? Let me know with a comment or email to genwishlist@gmail.com. I want to add links to blogs that are following along with me.