Tuesday, August 30, 2011

Tombstone Tuesday - Susan ESTEP SANDERS and son Winfield

SUSAN
wife of Wm B Sanders
Died
Aug 23 1864
in her 60th year
WINFIELD S
Son of Wm B & Susan Sanders
Died
26 Aug 1864
Aged
15 y 11 m 23 d

Bovard Cemetery
Cotton Township, Switzerland County, Indiana
Photo taken by Tina Lyons, May 2011

Monday, August 29, 2011

Will of Michael F Dincher


LAST WILL OF Michael F. Dincher

I, Michael F. Dincher of Limestone Township, Lycoming County, Pennsylvania, being of sound mind and memory do hereby make this my last will and testament, hereby revoking all wills by me at any time made.

First: I direct that all my just debts and my funeral expenses shall be paid by my Executor herein after named as soon after my death as convenient.

Second: To my beloved wife Marie, shall she survive me I give the use of all my real Estate and the use of all my personal property during her natural life. I also give to my wife the interest, during her life, on all money I may have at the time of my death.

Third: Upon my death, or upon the death of my wife, if she should survive me, all my real estate and farming implements shall go and belong to my two sons, Franz and Peter in equal shares, subject, however, to the conditions hereinafter named.

Fourth: Upon my death or the death of my wife, should she survive me, there shall be paid by my said Executor to my daughter Mary Eiswerth the sum of three hundred dollars out of the money that I have at interest or which may be on hand in cash.

Fifth: I place on my real estate and upon the farming herein named, and bequeathed to my sons Franz and Peter a valuation of $2700. My daughter Magdalena Dietrich shall receive one sixth part of $2700, less the sum of $155, which has been advanced to her by me.

Sixth: To the children of my deceased daughter Katharine I give one sixth part of said sum of $2700.

Eight: To my daughter Barbara Ulsamer I give one sixth part of said sum of $2700.

Ninth: The said one sixth part herein given to my daughter Magdalena Dietrich (less the $155) shall be paid her out of money on interest or cash on hand, as far as such money or cash may reach; any balance then due Magdalena Dietrich, as herein provided, and the amounts herein given to the children of said Margaret and said Katharine and the share herein given to said Barbara are to be paid by said Franz and Peter from and hereby charged upon, the real estate herein devised to my said sons Franz and Peter, subject to the payment thereof.

Tenth: The shares herein so charged on said real estate shall be paid to the parties for whose benefit they are so charged upon said real estate within four years of my death, or the death of my wife, should she survive me, without interest for the first and second years, but with interest at the rate of four percent, for the third and fourth years. All the residue, rest and remainder of my property, real, personal and  mixed, shall be divided into six equal shares; one one share shall go to the children of said Margaret; one share to Magdalena Dietrich, one share to the children of said Katharine; one share to said Barbara; one share to said Franz and one share to said Peter.

I hereby appoint my son Franz Executor of this my last will, but he shall not charge more than $25 for his services as such Executor.

In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal this 15” day of September one thousand eight hundred and ninety seven
Michael F Dincher {Seal}

We hereby certify that we were present and saw the said Dincher the above testator, sign the foregoing instrument; and we signed our names hereto as witnesses at his request and in his presence and in the presence of each other
F Deedmeyer
O W Good

State of Pennsylvania
County of Lycoming} SS:
Before me personally appeared Franz A Dincher who being duly sworn according to law, did depose and say that Michael F. Dincher late of said County deceased, died on or about the second day of November 1897 at 8 oclock A.M. at Limestone Township Lycoming County Pa.
Franz A Dincher

Citation:
Michael F Dincher (1897), Will Book: Volume 9, page 16-18; Lycoming County Genealogical Society Library, Williamsport, Pennsylvania.

National Black Genealogy Summit - October 20-22 - Fort Wayne

The first National Black Genealogy Summit will be held October 20-22 in Fort Wayne, Indiana. Speakers include Tony Burroughs, Shamele Jordon, Lisa Lee, Tim Pinnick, Angela Walton-Raji, and many more. Early registration ends on Labor Day, so register now.

I will be at the Indiana Genealogical Society's booth in the exhibit hall during the summit. Stop by and say hi.

From the website:
Genealogists Will Explore African Ancestry in Fort Wayne, Indiana at the National Black Genealogy Summit, October 20 - 22, 2011

The African American Genealogy Society of Fort Wayne and the Allen County Public Library with its Genealogy Center proudly present this unique opportunity: National Black Genealogy Summit. The theme of the summit is African Diaspora: Awakening Our Legacy. Prospective, novice, intermediate, and advanced genealogists will convene for the National Black Genealogy Summit, October 20 - 22, 2011 at the Grand Wayne Center and Allen County Public Library (ACPL). This conference promises an innovative, comprehensive, and hands-on approach to genealogical and historical research. Experts in African American genealogy will demonstrate research strategies, provide useful tips, and explore new resources. Extended research hours in the Allen County Public Library's Genealogy Center will be available exclusively to conference attendees.

The ACPL Genealogy Center is internationally acclaimed for being the world's second largest repository of genealogy resources. The comprehensive collection contains more than one million textual items and access to billions of searchable records offered through major online genealogical databases. All are available for free use in the Center. Expert staff, well-versed in genealogical research, is always available to assist researchers.

Sunday, August 28, 2011

12 Days of Family and Genealogy - 52 Weeks of Personal Genealogy - Grandma Edition

This post is part of my series of the 12 days I spent with my parents visiting family and doing genealogy research.

I dropped off the first of Amy Coffin's 52 Weeks of Personal Genealogy questions to my grandma when I visited in June. She had them all filled out for me when I visited her at the beginning of the month. Although most of her answers were along the lines of "I don't remember," I did gather a few new details about her life.

Here's what I learned:
  • Her first car was a green Chevy Impala.
  • She had a white mouse as a pet, but she doesn't remember its name.
  • My grandfather was apparently in the newspaper working on the Ohio River Front. I'd love to find that. Someone needs to digitize Cincinnati newspapers.
 I already knew about grandma's love of dark chocolate But she really wanted me to know since she wrote it twice for her favorite sweets.

Saturday, August 27, 2011

12 Days of Family and Genealogy - Edward Charles Eiswerth Draft Postcards

This post is part of my series of the 12 days I spent with my parents visiting family and doing genealogy research.


While scanning my grandparents' photo albums, I came across some World War I draft cards for my great grandparents. Yesterday I shared the card for Eugene Eck along with some background information.

Here are the cards for Edward Charles Eiswerth.
 
In October 1918, Edward received notice that he was classified as 1A for the draft. 1A signified that he was available for unrestricted military service.
 
 In November 1918, he received another postcard with the same classification.
 
Edward was ordered to appear for a physical examination on 18 November 1918.

I don't know what happened after his exam. Although he had grown up on a farm and would have one of his own, at the time of the draft, he was working as a tire builder in East Palestine, Ohio. I assume that he was never called up in the draft to serve, since I have no evidence that he was involved in the military.

Friday, August 26, 2011

12 Days of Family and Genealogy - Eugene Eck Draft Postcards

This post is part of my series of the 12 days I spent with my parents visiting family and doing genealogy research.

While scanning my grandparents' photo albums, I came across some World War I draft cards for my great grandparents. Most people know that men had to register for the draft during WWI and WWII. They filled out cards with information (depending on the draft) about their birth dates, birth places, employer's information, next of kin, physical descriptions and more. What I found in my grandparents' collection was the postcards that the men received after they filled out the draft cards. The cards I found give the men their order number, serial number, and classification for the draft.

Here are the cards I found on Eugene Jerome Eck.
On 23 January 1918, Eugene was classified as Class 1A. This means he was available for unrestricted military service. In April 1918, his classification changed to 2C. 2C was given to men who were deferred from service due to an agricultural occupation. (Classification information from Wikipedia "Selective Service System" article.)

Eugene applied for the WWI draft on 5 June 1917. He listed his occupation as trucker and was self employed. He was working on his family's truck farm and was therefore in the agricultural business.

Tomorrow I'll post the cards on Edward Charles Eiswerth.

Thursday, August 25, 2011

12 Days of Family and Genealogy - Great Grandma's Gallstones

This post is part of my series of the 12 days I spent with my parents visiting family and doing genealogy research.

Yesterday I wrote about my great grandpa's false teeth that my aunt has kept over the decades. My aunt was a middle school health teacher and her grandparents gifted her things that might interest her. I mentioned yesterday that she showed me two things from the box she pulled off her shelf. One was the teeth. Here's the other:
Great grandma's gallstones! In April 1974, my great grandmother, Magdalena Haefner Eck had surgery to remove her gallstones. Dr. Ratke was her doctor. Originally the stones were preserved in formaldehyde, but my aunt dumped it out and just kept the stones (and what appears to be a gross slick of formaldehyde at the bottom of the jar). What a wonderful present from your grandma! I wonder if she wrapped it up.

Wednesday, August 24, 2011

12 Days of Family and Genealogy - Great Grandpa's Teeth

This post is part of my series of the 12 days I spent with my parents visiting family and doing genealogy research.

While staying at my aunt's house in Williamsport, she started looking through her things to see if there was anything that would interest me. I never would have guessed what she found. 

She pulled out 2 things from a small box. You'll find out about the second thing tomorrow. Here's the first item she showed me:

These aren't just any dentures. These false teeth belong to my great-grandpa, Eugene Jerome Eck. This was apparently his first pair.

Why does my aunt have these teeth? She was a middle school health teacher and my great grandparents apparently passed things on to her that she might find interesting. Why she still has them is another story. But at least I got to see a part of my great grandfather decades after his death.

Just wait until you see what great-grandma left her.

Tuesday, August 23, 2011

12 Days of Family and Genealogy - Spring Grove Cemetery

This post is part of my series of the 12 days I spent with my parents visiting family and doing genealogy research.

After our trip to Williamsport, I spent some days at my parents' house before attending the Kentucky Genealogical Society's annual seminar with Elizabeth Shown Mills. One of the days there I dragged my mom to the Spring Grove Cemetery in Cincinnati.

This is a massive cemetery. Luckily they have their burial records available online. I knew the section and lot numbers of the graves I wanted to find. Even with a map, it was hard to find the right sections, let alone lots. I found a few and then gave up for the day since it was so hot and I wanted to go shopping.

Here are some of the gravestones that I found:



Tombstone Tuesday - George W SANDERS and Sarah Jane DUNNING


GEORGE W SANDERS
Born Feb. 24 1842 Died Aug. 10 1901
SARAH JANE SANDERS
Born 23 Apr. 1842 Died Mar. 14 1926

Bovard Cemetery
Cotton Township, Switzerland County, Indiana
Photo taken by Tina Lyons, May 2011

Monday, August 22, 2011

12 Days of Family and Genealogy - Lycoming County Genealogical Society Library

This post is part of my series of the 12 days I spent with my parents visiting family and doing genealogy research.

On our last day in Williamsport, I helped my aunt with the neighborhood garage sale. This was how I paid for my stay. After lunch, my parents dropped me off at the Lycoming County Genealogical Society's Library. I was able to spend 2 hours there and find some records on my family.

Here's a sampling of what I found:
  • Williamsport City Death Records 1879-1927 - I found the records for Margaret Blitz and her son Joseph Blitz, but no record of Valentine Blitz (my favorite ancestor). I was hoping to find more than the year on his tombstone to help me locate an obituary.
  • Lycoming County Will Books 1795-1903 - I was hoping to find more wills, but apparently my ancestors didn't write them. I was able to find the wills of Michael F Dincher, Valentine Blitz, and Margaret Eck.
  • Surname Books - They only had "books" on my Eck family, but they had a lot of them. Most of them were just family group sheets, but a few had newspaper articles, marriage licenses, deeds and more. My grandmother told me she threw away all of her research, but some of these "books" were actually binders filled with what I believe to be here research. One clue that it is hers was my parents wedding announcement. Another was her name written on some pages in random spots.
  • Vertical Files - I searched for my Lycoming County surnames again and found a few files, but nothing of interest inside.
I hope to visit this library again someday. I should try to go through their tax records and hopefully find something interesting for the Eiswerth surname book.

Sunday, August 21, 2011

12 Days of Family and Genealogy - Eiswerth Surname Book

This post is part of my series of the 12 days I spent with my parents visiting family and doing genealogy research.

One of my 2011 genealogy goals is to write a book about my Eiswerth surname. On my trip to Williamsport last summer, I was able to find mention of the town where the family originated in Bavaria. Then I was lucky to find that FamilySearch had an index to the Catholic Church records for that town. This summer I have been ordering microfilm from the Family History Library and finding the original records for the baptisms, marriages and burials of the Eiswerth family in Zeiskam, Bavaria.

I put together everything that I had so far and created the "preliminary edition" (husband named it that) of the Eiswerth surname book.

Here is the cover:

I shared this edition with the family while in Williamsport. They all really enjoyed it. My grandfather was amazed at how many details I had found and gotten right about the family. He told me that the 1927 Agricultural Census taken in Pennsylvania "sounded about right" for what the family was doing on their farm. Here is that part of the book:
"In 1927, Pennsylvania took a census of the agriculture in the state. At the time, Edward’s [Edward Charles Eiswerth]  farm had 100 acres, 35 of which were used for crops. He had 7 acres of grain, 8 acres of wheat, 5 acres of oats, and 2 acres of Irish potatoes. There were 100 apple trees bearing fruit, 25 young apple trees and 12 pear trees. He had 2 horses, 5 cows, 5 pigs, 50 chickens and 1 automobile."
 
Eventually I would like to publish it as a book, but I have so much more that I want to find and add to the lives of my ancestors. For example, I am waiting for the 1940 census (the last census my grandfather lived with his parents) and finding the family in ship passenger lists would be nice too.

Tuesday, August 16, 2011

Tombstone Tuesday - Williard Theodore BASCOM and Susan SANDERS


BASCOM
W.T.
1871-1934
SUSIE
1870-1927

Bovard Cemetery
Cotton Township, Switzerland County, Indiana
Photo taken by Tina Lyons, May 2011

Monday, August 15, 2011

12 Days of Family and Genealogy - Immaculate Conception Cemetery

This post is part of my series of the 12 days I spent with my parents visiting family and doing genealogy research.

After our first stop in Williamsport, Pennsylvania to the St. Boniface Cemetery and dropping off my things at my aunt's house, we headed to Bastress and the Immaculate Conception Cemetery.

My aunt had previously taken some photos at this cemetery, but I had a transcription and went to find the rest of the stones of our relatives. Here are just a few of the stones we found:









In the background you can tell how this cemetery is on the side of a mountain. It made for a good workout.

Saturday, August 13, 2011

12 Days of Family and Genealogy - St. Boniface Cemetery

This post is part of my series of the 12 days I spent with my parents visiting family and doing genealogy research.
 
Our first stop upon arriving in Williamsport, Pennsylvania was the St. Boniface Cemetery. Regular readers may remember that this was also our first stop on our trip last year.

Last year I was looking for the tombstone of my favorite ancestor, Valentine Blitz. After another year of research and obtaining the St. Boniface Church Records on microfilm from the Family History Library, I was able to find the married names of two of his daughters. Now I have the whole family pieced together. This years cemetery trip was to find the tombstones of the rest of the Blitz family.


Lena Gaus 1864-1926
Frank J Gaus 1863-1932


Charles L Snyder 1858-1934
Margaret Snyder 1861-1934

While slowly making our way out of the cemetery, we discovered a few interesting markers. The one below was cast around bricks that are now visible at the bottom.
Genofeva Kunkel (born Raible)
1843-1875

Her children
Maria 1867-1875
Adam 1873-1875

Following the cemetery trip, we dropped off my stuff at my aunt's house (where I was staying) and visited my grandparents next door. Then we went to another cemetery.

Thursday, August 11, 2011

12 Days of Family and Genealogy - Scanning

This post is part of my series of the 12 days I spent with my parents visiting family and doing genealogy research.

My scanner was one of the major items that I had to pack for this trip. I was hoping to find more old photos in Pennsylvania and I scored! I was able to scan 3 albums from my grandparents house. Not only did they contain photos, but there were also a few documents. In another post I will write about the draft cards that I found.

On returning to Cincinnati, I visited my grandma and returned the boxes of slides that I had borrowed and pick up the last batch. My mom found this last batch the last time I was visiting (when I thought I was getting the last batch). Most of them are unlabeled and are probably just vacation pictures from my grandparents' many trips (which there in about 30 more boxes that I'm not scanning). But hopefully I'll find something interesting.
 
 
I also borrowed my dad's collection of slides. Luckily not all of these cubes are filled.


The one thing I like about scanning all of the family slides is that most of them are labeled better than the pictures and old movies that I have already digitized. Putting them all together gives me a better idea of when and where the photos were taken.

While I was at my parents, I also scanned 3 boxes of photos. Now I just need to organize and label them all. But I think I'll wait until I finish with the slides and have everything to compare.

Wednesday, August 10, 2011

12 Days of Family and Genealogy - KGS Seminar with ESM

This post is part of my series of the 12 days I spent with my parents visiting family and doing genealogy research.

I'm going to start with the end of the trip. On Saturday, August 6, I traveled to Frankfort, Kentucky for the Kentucky Genealogical Society's annual seminar. The speaker was Elizabeth Shown Mills. This seminar was the reason I spent so many days with my parents. I could have gone back to Fort Wayne after we returned from Pennsylvania, but I figured I could get some research done if I stayed in Cincinnati instead of going home and coming right back.

Elizabeth Shown Mills was awesome as always. I heard her speak at FGS 2010 in Knoxville and I couldn't pass up a chance to hear her again (especially since she is not speaking at FGS 2011). I had heard one of the talks that she gave in Kentucky at FGS and it was worth hearing it again since she packs so much information into a short time and you can't even try to get it all in one dose.

Her talks were:
  • Genealogical Problem Solving: Professional Techniques for Everyday Sucess
  • Proving "Oral History": How to Find the Truth About a Family Story
  • In a Rut? 7 Ways to Jump-Start Your Research
  • The Genealogical Proof Standard: How to Build a Case When No Record States the Answer
Ms. Mills was even signing her books. I had her sign my copy of Evidence! Citation & Analysis for the Family Historian. I was too lazy to drag my copy of Evidence Explained around since I had already packed everything else I owned for the long trip.

Then Ms. Mills was kind enough to take her picture with the 3 geneabloggers who were in attendance.
Linda McCauley, Elizabeth Shown Mills, Tina Lyons, Deborah Andrew

One of the highlights of the day was spending time with fellow bloggers, Linda and Deborah. I was able to catch up with Linda McCauley from Documenting the Details. Linda and I met at FGS 2010 and it was wonderful to be together again. It was also great to meet Deborah Andrew from The Sum Of All My Research.

It was a wonderful end to my 12 days trip.

Photos courtesy of Linda McCauley.

12 Days of Family and Genealogy - Introduction

I returned home Sunday after 12 days spent with my parents. We spent a few days in Williamsport, Pennsylvania visiting my grandparents and extended family, taking tombstone photos and researching at the local genealogy society's library. Then I spent some more days staying at my parents' house near Cincinnati, Ohio and scanning photos, visiting a cemetery, and visiting grandma. On Saturday, I went to Frankfort, Kentucky to spend the day at the Kentucky Genealogical Society's annual seminar.

I'll be doing a series of blog posts about those 12 days. Posts will include:
I had a great time over those 12 days. No one went insane, but I have seen enough television to last me a few years.

Tuesday, August 9, 2011

Tombstone Tuesday - Ursula SHEPHERD BOVARD

URSULA BOVARD
BORN
Sept 14, 1823
DIED
May 24, 1892

Bovard Cemetery
Cotton Township, Switzerland County, Indiana
Photo taken by Tina Lyons, May 2011

Tuesday, August 2, 2011

Tombstone Tuesday - Jane Bovard

JANE
Daughter of
ROBERT & MARGARET BOVARD
Died
Dec. 8, 1837
Aged 24 yrs.
3 mos. 22 Ds.

Bovard Cemetery
Cotton Township, Switzerland County, Indiana
Photo taken by Tina Lyons, May 2011